Native Plants

Native plants title image

Clearing for agriculture and urban development has significantly reduced the extent and condition of native vegetation across the Camden Local Government Area (LGA). Native vegetation is also being impacted by overgrazing, nutrient run-off, weed infestation, salinity, erosion and sedimentation.

The plants and the vegetation communities provide a variety of habitats to a range of animals, including birds, mammals and insects. Because some of this vegetation has been extensively removed in the past and is still subject to various impacts, a number of plants and animals have been listed as threatened at a state and / or national level.

What plant species are found in the Camden LGA?

Up to 1,189 plants or flora species have been recorded in Camden Local Government Area. Of these, 712 species are native species and 477 species are exotic or introduced. There areĀ seven species which are listed as threatened in NSW and nationally andĀ one species which is listed as an endangered population in NSW.

Threatened species may be listed at a state level under the NSW Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 (BC Act) or at a national level under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

The threatened species at the state and national level which occur in Camden LGA include:

  • Camden White Gum (Eucalyptus benthamii);
  • White-flowered Wax Plant (Cynanchum elegans);
  • Juniper-leaved Grevillea (Grevillea juniperina subsp. juniperina);
  • Native Pear (Marsdenia viridiflora supsp. viridiflora);
  • Spiked Rice-flower (Pimelia spicata);
  • Brown Pomaderris (Pomaderris brunnea);
  • Matted Bush Pea (Puntenaea pedunculata); and
  • Magenta Lilly Pilly (Syzygium paniculatum).

Download theĀ Flora Species ListĀ for the Camden LGA.

What are the main vegetation communities in the Camden LGA?

The three main native vegetation communities in the Camden LGAĀ are:

  • Cumberland Plain Woodland;
  • River-flat Eucalypt Forest; and
  • Swamp Oak Floodplain Forest.

Camden Local Government Area (LGA) occurs on the Cumberland Plain. The main vegetation community is Cumberland Plain Woodland which is made of the two prominent Eucalypts, Grey Box (Eucalyptus moluccana) and Forest Red Gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) which typify the remaining treed landscape of Camden.

The ground layer in Cumberland Plain Woodland is typically made up of grasses such as Kangaroo Grass (Themeda triandra) and Weeping Meadow Grass (Microlaeana stipoides).

There are other native plants that occur in other vegetation communities such as the forest that occurs along the Nepean River.

The plants and the vegetation communities provide a variety of habitats to a range of animals, including birds, mammals and insects. Because some of this vegetation has been extensively removed in the past and is still subject to various impacts, a number of plants and animals have been listed as threatened at a state and / or national level.

What endangered ecological communities are found within the Camden LGA?

An Endangered Ecological Community (EEC) or Critically Endangered Ecological Community (CEEC) are those that have been identified to be at risk of extinction due to a reduction in its distribution, habitat fragmentation and invasion by exotic species.

Endangered ecological communities may be listed at a state level under the NSW Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 (BC Act) or at a national level under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

There are six ecological communities found within the Camden LGA that are either listed as endangered or critically endangered:

Map of Endangered Ecological CommunitiesĀ in Camden LGA is available for viewing.

How can I introduce more native plant species to my garden?

Native vegetation is important for the health of our environment, as it provides habitat for our native plants and animals, including threatened species. You can create a native garden in your own backyard which is easier than you think. You can create vibrant, colourful gardens with amazing colours, shapes and scents. Your native garden can act as a biodiversity corridor or ā€˜stepping stoneā€™ to allow wildlife to move between patches of existing bushland.

Camden Native Garden Guide Cover Image

TheĀ Camden Native Garden GuideĀ has been developed to help residents improve the existing biodiversity in their garden, or to design a native garden from scratch.Ā 

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